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New Theory Links Early-Onset Alzheimer’s to How Cells Store Iron

A team of scientists has proposed a new theory suggesting that the way our cells handle iron could be linked to the development of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Their findings are published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience.Researchers from the University of Adelaide in Australia led a new study investigating the potential link between iron in our cells and the rare gene mutations that cause Alzheimer’s disease. If proven, the theory could assist in finding new ways to prevent the debilitating disease.The scientists caution against making choices about diet or supplements based on this idea, however, as the theory only relates to how our cells handle iron, not how much iron is in our diet.“For 20 years, most scientists have believed that a small protein fragment, amyloid beta, causes Alzheimer’s disease,” said Associate Professor Michael Lardelli from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Adelaide.“Clearing out amyloid beta from the brains of people who are …

Thinning of Retina May Signal Parkinson’s Disease

A new South Korean study finds that a thinning retina appears to correspond with a known sign of Parkinson’s disease — the loss of dopamine-producing brain cells.Parkinson’s disease is a progressive nervous system disorder. Nerve cell damage in the brain leads to a drop in dopamine levels, which can lead to symptoms such as tremors, stiffness and a loss of balance.“Our study is the first to show a link between the thinning of the retina and a known sign of the progression of the disease — the loss of brain cells that produce dopamine,” said study author Jee-Young Lee, M.D., Ph.D., of the Seoul Metropolitan Government – Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center in South Korea.“We also found the thinner the retina, the greater the severity of disease. These discoveries may mean that neurologists may eventually be able to use a simple eye scan to detect Parkinson’s disease in its earliest stages, before problems with movement begin.”The study involved 49 individuals (average age o…

Status Symbols May Not Attract New Friends – Just The Opposite

A new study suggests the desire to appear successful as a means to gain new friends may actually be counterproductive. In fact, lavish accoutrements can actually repel prospective acquaintances.“Oftentimes we think that status symbols — whether a luxury car like a BMW, a brand name purse like Prada, or an expensive watch like Rolex — will make us look more socially attractive to others,” said researcher Dr. Stephen Garcia of the University of Michigan.“However, our research suggests that these status signals actually make us look less socially attractive, not more.”The scientists conducted a series of six studies, where participants either presented themselves as possible friends, or they were the people evaluating who they would want to be their friends.Throughout the studies, people presenting themselves to a new group chose higher status items. Yet for the people asked about who they would want to be friends with, they preferred people with lower or neutral status symbols.The study…

High Maternal Cortisol in Pregnancy Linked to Mood Symptoms in Daughters

Female toddlers whose mothers had high levels of cortisol during pregnancy are more likely to display anxious and depressive-like behaviors, according to a new study published in the journal Biological Psychiatry.Often called the “stress hormone,” cortisol is a steroid produced in the adrenal glands. Not only does it help manage stress, but it also helps regulate blood sugar levels, metabolism, inflammation and memory formulation.Based on brain scans taken first as newborns and again at two years old, high levels of maternal cortisol and resulting mood symptoms in the toddlers were linked to altered activity in the amygdala, a brain region associated with sensory and emotion processing.The findings reveal a potential pathway through which the prenatal environment may predispose females to developing mood disorders.“Higher maternal cortisol during pregnancy was linked to alterations in the newborns’ functional brain connectivity, affecting how different brain regions can communicate wi…

Ex-Wife Will Not Allow Son to Play Baseball

My wife and I have been divorced for 2 years. My 11 year old son loves baseball and is very good. My ex does everything she can to not let him play. When he is with her he misses practices and has missed games. He of course is not happy with this but is very respectful and does not question as to why. She even went so far as to not let him complete his last season and didn’t let him play in the final tournament, stating simply they had other plans. (Which of course they did not).My question is what are the psychological effects of denying children the ability to do something they love? I don’t think it matters if it’s sports, art or music.I’m curious as to what you think?Thank you for your assistance, any info you can provide would be helpful.I think the problem isn’t baseball. The problem is that your wife and maybe you are still fighting but you are doing so through your son. If you were focused on your child instead of on who does what or differences in opinion about what is best f…