Skip to main content

Preschoolers’ Social Skills Can Make Up For Low Vocabulary

Preschoolers' Social Skills Can Make Up For Low Vocabulary

Shy preschoolers with low vocabulary skills can still fit in quite well with their peers if they possess high-level social communication skills, according to a new study published in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology.

Some examples of social communication skills include non-verbal communication (e.g. ability to recognize when other people are upset), inappropriate initiation (e.g. talking repetitively about something that no one is interested in) and use of context (e.g. ability to adapt and communicate based on situation and audience).

Contrary to the existing theory that shy children with low vocabulary skills struggle with peer likability, the new study shows that as long as a shy child is equipped with high functioning social skills and is able to react well across different social situations, the child’s poor vocabulary skills become inconsequential. In other words, social communication skills appear to have a buffering effect.

The study was co-authored by Dr. Cheung Hoi Shan, an assistant professor of social sciences at Yale-NUS (National University of Singapore) College, and Dr. John Elliott, an associate professor from the department of psychology. The study involved 64 Singapore preschoolers between the ages of 4 and 6.

“Presumably, having a good expressive vocabulary, and by extension a good command of language, makes it easier for children to engage and interact with peers,” said Cheung. “However, we have found that the presence of a good vocabulary in a shy child offered no additional buffering effect for peer likeability if the child did not possess high-functioning social communication skills.”

“Conversely, shy children with poor vocabulary skills were assumed to be less likeable, but high-functioning social communication skills serve as an effective buffer against the presumed language disadvantage. The more shy a child was, the more pronounced the effect of social communication skills.”

Traditionally, parents tend to focus on increasing a child’s vocabulary as the way to improve a child’s language and communication skills. However, it appears to be social communication skills, rather than a good vocabulary, that serves as a protective function for shy children, helping to increase their peer likability.

“Social communication skills such as making eye contact, ability to adapt and communicate in different situations can be taught deliberately, instead of leaving children to observe and pick up these skills on their own. Parents of shy children may want to consider developing such skills in their children so that they can learn how to better engage with their peers, helping them to develop meaningful relationships despite their shyness,” said Cheung.

The implications of the research are particularly relevant to families who live in Singapore’s multilingual environment as the study included local bilingual or trilingual preschoolers.

Elliott noted the impact of culture and the local context on the study. “It turns out that being a shy child in Singapore is not quite the negative thing it is often thought to be in places like the United States, which have strongly individualistic cultures,” he said.

“In Singapore, it may be considered quite appropriate, and need not diminish the child’s popularity among peers, if the child has good social communication skills.”

Source: Yale-NUS College



from Psych Central News http://ift.tt/2wBtpK6
via IFTTT

Become a patron of The Carlisle Wellness Network. Show everyone that you think this service is worth at least a buck. Go to; http://ift.tt/2i70pBW and pledge one dollar per month and help improve the resources it takes to gather the articles you see here as well as create fresh content including interviews an podcasts. We only need one dollar per month from all of our patrons to give The Carlisle Wellness Network a bright furture in the health and wellness social media ecosystem.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Working Remotely Is Not Necessarily Stress-Free

Many believe that working from home or remotely can foster freedom and stress-free job satisfaction, and that everyone wants  more work autonomy.A new study from Baylor University in Waco, Texas, says “Not so fast.”In the study, researchers examined the impact of remote work on employee well-being. Their findings suggest that a variety of factors can undermine or accent the employee benefits of working off-site.Accordingly, researchers developed new strategies to help managers provide remote-work opportunities that are valuable to the employee and the company.“Any organization, regardless of the extent to which people work remotely, needs to consider well-being of their employees as they implement more flexible working practices,” the researchers wrote.The study appears in the European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology.In the review, a total of 403 working adults were surveyed for the two studies that made up the research, said lead author Sara Perry, Ph.D.Researchers meas…

New video by Global Mountain Bike Network on YouTube

Will Crashing Break A Carbon MTB Frame? | Ask GMBN Anything About Mountain Biking
Will a carbon mountain bike frame break if you crash on it? Can you ride a cross country MTB on rough trails? What is the best way to train for a 6 hour mountain bike race? How do you fix a bent brake lever? Martyn and Neil answer all of your questions in this week's ask 👇 Subscribe to GMBN: http://bit.ly/1HnIPRp Get exclusive GMBN gear in the GMBN store! https://gmbn.eu/13h We like to help here at GMBN so leave your questions in the comments below using #AskGMBN and we'll try to answer it 🤘 If you'd like to contribute captions and video info in your language, here's the link 👍 https://gmbn.eu/13g Watch more on GMBN... 📹 Blake Shreds A CX Bike | http://bit.ly/2BcY80n 🎵 Music - licensed by Epidemic Sound Burgess Hill - Ocean Jams Pullen Park Submit your content here: http://bit.ly/2EJQPAP Click here to buy GMBN T-shirts, hoodies and more: http://gmbn.eu/GMBNShop The Global Mountain Bik…