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NPR News: Doctors Scrutinize Overtreatment, As Cancer Death Rates Decline

Doctors Scrutinize Overtreatment, As Cancer Death Rates Decline
Are some people getting too much treatment for their cancers? The answer, from the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago, is an emphatic yes.

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