Skip to main content

Recreating A Task in Advance Can Boost Prospective Memory

A new study finds that pretending in advance to carry out a needed task, in as much detail as possible, can increase the likelihood you will remember to do it.

Whether it is picking up something at the grocery store or remembering to take medication, prospective memory is a regular feature of daily life. And when prospective memory fails, it can be an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease, according to researchers.

“Poor prospective memory can range from the vaguely annoying to life threatening, depending on the circumstances,” said Dr. Antonina Pereira from the University of Chichester, who led the study. “We wanted to confirm two things — that prospective memory deteriorates with age and that enactment techniques might support those with a poor prospective memory.”

In research published in the journal Neuropsychology, researchers studied the prospective memory performance of 96 participants, including patients with mild cognitive impairment between the ages of 64 and 87, healthy older adults between the ages of 62 to 84, and younger adults between the ages of 18 and 22.

The study, which also included researchers from Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands, Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, and the University of Lisbon in Portugal, looked at prospective memory performance before the introduction of an enhancement technique. They then compared it with performance after enhancement.

The technique used was encoded enactment, where subjects were encouraged to act out in their minds the activity they must remember to do, the researchers said.

Participants in all age groups reported improvement in prospective memory, but it was particularly marked in those older subjects with mild cognitive impairment, the study discovered.

The study’s findings suggests that encouraging people in this category to adopt enactment as a way to enhance prospective memory could result in them leading independent, autonomous lives for longer, the researchers say.

“We did indeed find that prospective memory erodes as we get older, and our early findings in this little researched area would suggest that enactment techniques are effective in improving prospective memory,” Pereira said. “We were heartened to see that there was improvement in our group with mild cognitive impairment.

“Enactment techniques offer the potential for a cost-effective and widely applicable method that can support independent living. This contributes to an individual’s health, well-being and social relationships while reducing the burden of care.”

Pereira offered a tip for overcoming poor prospective memory. “The next time you would like to remember to pick up a pint of milk from the store on your way home, do not wait until you have got home to realize you have forgotten to do it. Instead, recreate the action you would like to remember, pretending that you are actually doing it, in as much vivid detail as possible.

“This might feel awkward to begin with, but it has been identified as an optimal technique to enhance prospective memory. It can have very long-lasting effects and work even for people with cognitive impairment. Acting is the key.”

Source: University of Chichester

Photo: University of Chichester psychologists have studied prospective memory to accurately diagnose diseases of cognitive impairment. Credit: University of Chichester.



from Psych Central News https://ift.tt/2MlxAxx
via IFTTT

Become a patron of The Carlisle Wellness Network. Show everyone that you think this service is worth at least a buck. Go to; https://www.patreon.com/carlislewellness and pledge one dollar per month and help improve the resources it takes to gather the articles you see here as well as create fresh content including interviews an podcasts. We only need one dollar per month from all of our patrons to give The Carlisle Wellness Network a bright furture in the health and wellness social media ecosystem.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Hair Pulling, Nail Biting, Skin Peeling and Biting

All my life I’ve bitten my nails. It’s caused me a lot of trouble, especially with my bipolar mother who has always thought screaming and shouting at me (and often a smack when I was younger) would make me stop.At around 7 I also started biting and peeling the skin on my fingers which has caused a lot of social and health issues for me from being to ashamed to join in with prayers at school, to getting my fingers getting a fungal infection causing long lasting damage to my fingers.Soon after I started to pull out the tiny hairs on my legs during school assembles and by 12 I began to pull my eyebrow hair out.How can I stop doing this to myself? I don’t even realise I’m doing it half the time (I started biting the skin around my fingers just writing this and caused it to bleed a little). I’m afraid to bring this up with my parents because of how they have reacted in the past and I’m far too embarrassed to ask anyone I would typically trust. It has severally impacted how I interact with …

Painful Memories Evoke More Intense Emotions in Those With Depression

People with major depressive disorder (MDD) experience more intense negative emotions while recalling painful memories compared to non-depressed people, according to a new study published in the journal Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.And although those with MDD were able to turn down their negative emotions about as well as non-depressed people, they used different brain circuits to do so.The new findings pinpoint brain differences in MDD associated with the processing of autobiographical memories — one’s memories of personal events and knowledge of one’s life — that help us develop our sense of self and guide our interactions with the world around us.“This study provides new insights into the changes in brain function that are present in major depression,” said journal editor Cameron Carter, M.D. “It shows differences in how memory systems are engaged during emotion processing in depression and how people with the disorder must regulate these systems i…

People with depression have stronger emotional responses to negative memories

People with major depressive disorder (MDD) feel more negative emotion when remembering painful experiences than people without the disorder, according to a new study. The study reports that people with MDD were able to control the negative emotions about as well as people unaffected by MDD, but used somewhat different brain circuits to do so.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2D4icA6
via IFTTTBecome a patron of The Carlisle Wellness Network. Show everyone that you think this service is worth at least a buck. Go to; https://www.patreon.com/carlislewellness and pledge one dollar per month and help improve the resources it takes to gather the articles you see here as well as create fresh content including interviews an podcasts. We only need one dollar per month from all of our patrons to give The Carlisle Wellness Network a bright furture in the health and wellness social media ecosystem.