Skip to main content

Sudden Distaste & Numbness to Social Interaction

I’ve always been a bit weird with social interaction. Sometimes I’ll have days where I need to recharge after being around people too much, be too scared to talk to people, or more simply be content eith being alone. Though recently I’ve been hating social interaction and have felt completely numb in general. Then when I don’t feel numb, I distrust and don’t want to be close to people I trust dearly. Or I simply just want them away from me for no reason. So I’m either aggressive, numb, or randomly anxious that I’m being too distant or too abrasive.

It’s sort of scary to watch myself be like this since this is really a first for me. I’ve never really had some sort of need for social interaction, but I could feel a difference and know that I was actually feeling better around people I like. But now I don’t want to be near anyone, and when I am forced to talk to someone (Either our of guilt or because of some family related thing) I feel disassociated from myself. Like I’m not even me. And that’s probably the worst part since I’m so used to knowing what I am, even if it doesn’t make perfect sense (Ie- knowing that me hating myself is wrong, even if I genuinely feel like I don’t deserve to be helped). So yeah.

A. You might try keeping a journal where you document the changes you are noticing. That might help to pinpoint the problem, if any.

It’s also important to remember that this may be temporary. Moods change and its normal to feel a range of emotions, they fluctuate. Perhaps you feel a particular way after interacting with certain people. Maybe it’s worse after you have had a rough day at school or watch a particular program or listen to a specific song. Journaling might help you to uncover patterns in your feelings and moods.

If this continues to be a problem, I would recommend counseling. It is ideal for these types of issues. Counseling offers many great benefits, the most obvious being the objectivity of the therapist. An objective, trained, third-party can sometimes see problems where we can’t.

Finally, please know that you deserve to be helped. There’s no reason in the world why you are not deserving of help. Those types of feelings are likely contributing to what may be wrong. Counseling can eradicate these types of negative thoughts. Thanks for your question. Please take care.

Dr. Kristina Randle



from Ask the Therapist https://ift.tt/2OlWmxQ
via IFTTT

Become a patron of The Carlisle Wellness Network. Show everyone that you think this service is worth at least a buck. Go to; https://www.patreon.com/carlislewellness and pledge one dollar per month and help improve the resources it takes to gather the articles you see here as well as create fresh content including interviews an podcasts. We only need one dollar per month from all of our patrons to give The Carlisle Wellness Network a bright furture in the health and wellness social media ecosystem.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Hair Pulling, Nail Biting, Skin Peeling and Biting

All my life I’ve bitten my nails. It’s caused me a lot of trouble, especially with my bipolar mother who has always thought screaming and shouting at me (and often a smack when I was younger) would make me stop.At around 7 I also started biting and peeling the skin on my fingers which has caused a lot of social and health issues for me from being to ashamed to join in with prayers at school, to getting my fingers getting a fungal infection causing long lasting damage to my fingers.Soon after I started to pull out the tiny hairs on my legs during school assembles and by 12 I began to pull my eyebrow hair out.How can I stop doing this to myself? I don’t even realise I’m doing it half the time (I started biting the skin around my fingers just writing this and caused it to bleed a little). I’m afraid to bring this up with my parents because of how they have reacted in the past and I’m far too embarrassed to ask anyone I would typically trust. It has severally impacted how I interact with …

Painful Memories Evoke More Intense Emotions in Those With Depression

People with major depressive disorder (MDD) experience more intense negative emotions while recalling painful memories compared to non-depressed people, according to a new study published in the journal Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.And although those with MDD were able to turn down their negative emotions about as well as non-depressed people, they used different brain circuits to do so.The new findings pinpoint brain differences in MDD associated with the processing of autobiographical memories — one’s memories of personal events and knowledge of one’s life — that help us develop our sense of self and guide our interactions with the world around us.“This study provides new insights into the changes in brain function that are present in major depression,” said journal editor Cameron Carter, M.D. “It shows differences in how memory systems are engaged during emotion processing in depression and how people with the disorder must regulate these systems i…

People with depression have stronger emotional responses to negative memories

People with major depressive disorder (MDD) feel more negative emotion when remembering painful experiences than people without the disorder, according to a new study. The study reports that people with MDD were able to control the negative emotions about as well as people unaffected by MDD, but used somewhat different brain circuits to do so.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2D4icA6
via IFTTTBecome a patron of The Carlisle Wellness Network. Show everyone that you think this service is worth at least a buck. Go to; https://www.patreon.com/carlislewellness and pledge one dollar per month and help improve the resources it takes to gather the articles you see here as well as create fresh content including interviews an podcasts. We only need one dollar per month from all of our patrons to give The Carlisle Wellness Network a bright furture in the health and wellness social media ecosystem.